Posts Tagged ‘ pitch ’

How To Pitch to A Magazine Editor

Tips for Making It Through the Glossy Gates- This post is written from the perspective of an editor on what she looks for when reading a pitch.

(This post was written by Lynya Floyd and can originally be seen on http://talkingwriting.com/?p=28366)

I’ve been an editor at women’s magazines like GlamourEssence, and Family Circlefor more than a decade. As I worked my way up the masthead, I passed the late-night hours writing freelance stories.

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It’s been awhile since I blindly sent a pitch into the void, but I remember the awkward mix of feelings the process evoked. A fellow writer once explained that eager is how you feel when you’re waiting for your mistress to come over to an empty house. Anxious is what you are when your wife invites the mistress for dinner. With each pitch, I felt eager andanxious, thinking this could be my breakthrough, worried that my letter contained an embarrassing typo.

Back then, I had a routine: I’d take a walk—all right, a few paces—around my two-room studio to clear my head before sending a pitch letter. I’d take my focus off whatever story idea I needed to carefully thread on a hook in order to reel in an editor—and my next freelance check.

I’d make a cup of tea. Return a phone call. Watch a few minutes of the news. Then I’d do a final read, cut and paste it into an email, and click send.

Moments later, I’d refresh my inbox, expecting an immediate reply. But it never happened that way.

Now that I’m on the other side of the email exchange, I realize how many pitches come in to an editor. Our work days (and nights) overflow with tasks that are on tighter deadlines than the four weeks we generally have to get back to freelancers who pitch us.

But I can offer some tips for getting the best response. 

Checkout more of this great article by clicking the link above!

Krystle Coleman: Entertainment PR Pro

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Krystle Coleman is not your average 26-year-old.  A graduate of Florida Memorial University, she has found her calling and works dilligently to make her dreams a reality. Krystle is the owner of Midori Star Media, a boutique PR firm specializing in entertainment and sports. She has worked with Trina, Plies and many more. Krystle graduated from Florida Memorial in 2007 and launched her firm in 2009. While in school she interned with Def Jam Records as well as The Pub Report magazine. She started out as a  journalism major and got the opportunity to interview stars such as Lloyd and T.I while interning at Vibe Magazine.  She then developed a love for PR.

How did you land your first job?
My first job was with Slip-n-Slide Records. After interning with them throughout college, they hired me as the Director of PR.

What inspired you to open a boutique firm?
At the time I was living in Atlanta and working at a Internet PR firm. I didn’t want to work in corporate, so I quit. There are a lot of African American women in Atlanta who are successful with their own PR firms. I had connections through relationships I built while interning. I just stepped out on faith.

What are some advantages to working in a boutique firm?
Smaller settings. You can focus on one thing and have less accounts. You’re able to provide clients with more one-on-one attention.

What are common misconceptions of being an entertainment publicist?
People think its all about partying and sleeping around with clients. Its not about a glamorous life. It involves hard work.

What advice would you give to aspiring entertainment publicists?
Honestly ask yourself why you want to be in the business? What are you going to gain from it? Study masterheads consistently and research other publicists.

Why are internships so important in this industry?
Internships give you experience and exposure. You’re able to get hands on attention and improve your craft. I have been in this business for four years and I still attend workshops and research other professionals.

What inspired you to become an entertainment publicist?
I started out as a journalist. I knew I loved to write and I was good at it. Interning at magazines gave me the opportunity to interview artists. I became intrigued with PR. I wanted to know who emailed me to set up the interviews and what they did.

Describe a typical work day.
I wake up to tons of emails from both clients and media. I respond to those and read blogs to see if any of my clients are mentioned. I have conference calls, follow up and pitch. Basically a lot of communicating and meetings.

What is the most challenging aspect of your job?
It is very demanding and there is a lot of pressure. Clients want results quicker than you can deliver them sometimes. PR is not about instant gratification, it takes time.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your job?
For me, it’s a good feeling to see my clients in the media and getting exposure.

Contact Krystle via Twitter @KrystleColeman